You are browsing the archive for Collaboration.

Decoding Collaboration Part 3: Collective impact deconstructed

September 23, 2013 in Blog, Distribution

“The expectation that collaboration can occur without a supporting infrastructure is one of the most frequent reasons why it fails.” –Fay Hanley Brown, John Kania and Mark Kramer, Stanford Social Review

IMG_6232

Occupy New York staged in the financial district, directly across from the World Trade Center’s reconstruction effort. Credit Lisa Skube

Jo Ellen Green Kaiser, who leads The Media Consortium, has been going deep on collaboration in her work. Here, she generously offers a number of insights, with this the third of her three-part series:

News Collaborations:
Part I:
What do we mean by the word “collaboration”?
Part II:
How does collaboration create impact?
Part III: How might collaboration shape the future of journalism? (see below)

There is a reason why the virtues of editorial collaboration have been championed by any number of media watchers in publications like Mediashift, NiemanLabs, J-Lab, and Journalism Accelerator. Collaboration is seen as the best way to leverage scarce resources in order to create more impact than any of the participants could do individually.

To innovate around impact, the journalism world will need philanthropists who understand that collaboration also requires resources, not only for the outlets that collaborate, but for the backbone organizations that support these collaborations.

In this post, I’ll detail the Media Consortium’s 2012 May Day collaboration to demonstrate how one type of high-impact collaboration can be organized, the investment ours required, and the return it offers. Read the rest of this entry →

Decoding Collaboration Part 2: News collaborations – defining impact

August 8, 2013 in Blog, Community

Jo Ellen Green Kaiser, who leads The Media Consortium, has been going deep on collaboration in her work. Here, she generously offers a number of insights, with this the second of her three-part series:

Light at the end

Might defining impact to reflect new market realities for journalism help blaze a new trail to sector level transformation? Credit: Lisa Skube

News Collaborations:
Part I: What do we mean by the word “collaboration”?
Part II: How can collaboration create impact? (see below)
Part III: How can collaborations shape the future of journalism? (coming next)

As Jo Ellen describes it, “‘Collaboration’ has become such a sexy term in the journalism world that centers and sites are being built around it. As I noted in my previous post, content sharing, resource sharing, and even joint reporting is not new. What excites those of us looking to the future of journalism is what I have called networked collaboration… 

In a networked collaboration, a number of different outlets work together to produce original reporting around a particular topic. In vertical networks, that reporting is designed and supervised by one outlet; in horizontal networks, the work is co-operatively created, managed by a backbone organization with no editorial skin in the game…”

In this post we explore the implications of impact and look at a couple of different examples of networked collaborations. With some rich context around how news providers may gain more yield by breaking down what impact means, and potential ways to create more of it. Read the rest of this entry →

Decoding Collaboration Part 1: Can or should news collaboration be forced?

July 24, 2013 in Blog, Community

The Media Consortium LogoTo scale impact, invest in networks.

Jo Ellen Green Kaiser

Jo Ellen Green Kaiser is the executive director of The Media Consortium. Green-Kaiser’s rich background includes a BA from Yale, a PhD from the University of California, with an impressive body of work across numerous independent magazines; she is a leading figure in Jewish media and an expert on the Jewish social justice movement.

Journalism Accelerator

Jo Ellen Green Kaiser, who leads The Media Consortium, has been going deep on collaboration in her work. Here she generously offers a number of insights, with this the first of her three part series:

News Collaborations:
Part I: What do we mean by the word “collaboration”?
Part II: How does collaboration create impact?
Part III: How can collaborations shape the future of journalism?

With collaboration at the center of the JA’s work, we’ve followed Media Shift’s Collaboration Central work with interest.  As well as others who are monitoring new models of collaboration emerging across the news and information spectrum.  Civic engagement “table” development methodology is part of the DNA that inspired the JA’s cross network emphasis (“beyond the usual suspects”). Inspired by wildly successful state organizing efforts, collaboration in this instance fueled by a philanthropic community where funders worked in partnership to build infrastructure to deliver commonly held objectives, leveraging the existing capabilities of civic organizations already existing in the marketplace. Taking out all partisan attachment (progressives were the architects of this infrastructure) – the simple genius of this: How to deploy the power of civic good networks around common aims – respectful of unique missions – to deliver the combined capabilities of unique specialization already creating small scale impact in the marketplace? (i.e. content delivery, craft, community conduit, social, business, technology, product development, topical expertise, etc.) Last year about this time the JA was looking at the combination of revenue and sustainability related to collaboration. Taking this a step further, we’re revisiting this asking others where they see the greatest impact around networked collaboration. As well as asking, what are the barriers slowing progress?

In this post, Jo Ellen explores new working definitions of collaboration and opportunities to consider for deeper impact, leveraging collaboration to unleash the combined power of networks in more intentional and strategic ways. Read the rest of this entry →

Small Biz Survival

July 9, 2013 in Community, Resources

What can you expect to read here? Articles by and for small business people in rural areas and small towns. You face some special challenges in a small town small business, including:

  • Pressure from competitors in bigger cities
  • Pressure from competitors online, world wide
  • Scarce, or variable quality, resources to assist you locally
  • Tight labor supply, and a graying workforce
  • Lack of skills in your workforce
  • Isolation from your industry peers

But for each challenge, there is also opportunity:

  • The online market opens the world to you
  • Involvement in your community is your way to fight against decline
  • Land is usually cheap, compared to growing areas
  • Regulatory burdens tend to be lower than in well-developed regions
  • A little payroll usually goes a long way
  • Work ethic is usually high.”
    Source: Small Biz Survival

B Corps

June 1, 2013 in Distribution, Resources

B Corp certification is to sustainable business what Fair Trade certification is to coffee or USDA Organic certification is to milk.

B Corps are certified by the nonprofit B Lab to meet rigorous standards of social and environmental performance, accountability, and transparency.

Today, there is a growing community of more than 600 Certified B Corps from 15 countries and 60 industries working together toward 1 unifying goal: to redefine success in business” Source: B Corps

An effort is on to pass legislation in Oregon during the upcoming session that would create a legal framework for a new kind of company, one that bakes into its founding principles the idea of providing a benefit to its community and its environment in addition to providing a financial return.

Since 2007, the Philadelphia-based nonprofit B Lab has been certifying companies as B Corps., a program that benchmarks, measures and creates a community of like minded B Corp. companies. Think of it as similar to the LEED certification program for the green building industry.” Source: Christina Williams, Sustainable Business Oregon

JA Better Practices: Sixth annual Free Press Media Reform conference inspires a rich social narrative

April 26, 2013 in Blog, Distribution

Hilary Niles weighs in at the "Building Better Media Policy Reporting from the Ground Up" strategy session in Denver, at the Media Reform conference. Credit: Lisa Skube

Journalism Accelerator

In early April, JA participated in the Media Reform event, as Josh Stearns, the Journalism and Public Media Campaign Director for Free Press, described it: “A conference of [hundreds] of grassroots media makers.” JA met and talked with dozens of organizers, journalists and policy experts, attended great panels, and had the additional opportunity to meet with a number of leaders such as Jo Ellen Green Kaiser, executive director of Media Consortium; Lark Corbeil and Kimberly Lavender of Public News Service; Dan Moulthrop and Jill Miller Zimon of The Civic Commons; Tom Glaisyer of the Democracy Fund; Journalism That Matters leaders Michelle Ferrier and Peggy Holman; and digital media expert and journalism veteran Steve Outing, in addition to many, many others paired with numerous inspiring hallway conversations.

Covering the event across social channels, the JA designed social coverage to convey the powerful ideas of the people who came to share, learn and compare notes. Building a narrative across social platforms opens up new strategic ways to participate in content, deepen connections and offer important context. Here’s an overview on different ways you might tap into social channels, to develop your own content stream, build a rich narrative, expand your network and bring more return for the investment. Read the rest of this entry →

Journalism That Matters

April 12, 2013 in Community, Resources

Journalism That Matters is an evolving collaboration of individuals supporting the pioneers who are shaping the emerging news and information ecosystem.

JTM focuses on cultivating “healthy journalists” and lively, informative interaction between journalists, educators, reformers, and community members. We support renewing the inner life of the journalist, and embrace all forms of media engagement with an eye towards preparing the next generation of journalists for co-creation with emerging citizen journalist.

Since 2001, JTM [hosts] vibrant and catalytic “unconferences” that have inspired hundreds of widely varied media initiatives around the nation.

Using interactive conversation practices, including Open Space Technology, World Café, Appreciative Inquiry, and Dialogue, JTM events engage the potentials and creativity of the people who show up, inspiring breakthrough thinking and ongoing collaboration that effects positive change.” Source: Journalism That Matters

 

I think JTM needs to be here. I don’t think it’s a luxury. It’s essential at this point.  Without those who are willing to look far forward, those of us caught in the quagmire of the day to day and don’t have the mission, ability, or time to do that kind of work, this may sound corny, but it provides hope for those of us to know a group like JTM exists.  It provides hope and opportunity to secure the future for journalism.” Source: Martin Reynolds, Editor, the Oakland Tribune (via JTM)

JA Overview: Free Press Media Reform Denver conference

April 2, 2013 in Blog, Policy

Lisa and Nicole

JA’s Lisa Skube (left) and Nicole Staudinger at 2012 SXSW braving torrential rain. We’ll be taking two umbrellas to Denver. Credit: Lisa Skube

Journalism Accelerator

This week, the JA heads to the Media Reform Conference in Denver, brought to us by the good folks at Free Press. The JA gets to be one of the hundreds of participants joining with “Award-winning artists. Hollywood luminaries. Visionary activists. Veteran journalists. [and] D.C. heavyweights.” In addition to the Free Press Media Reform Conference that runs April 4th – 7th in Denver, Journalism that Matters will host “Journalism is Dead; Long Live Journalism” to discuss and consider fresh possibilities for the Front Range news ecosystem. Here’s a useful post from Patrick Kitano featured on Street Fight today focusing on the JTM Denver conference in which he outlines what he hopes to learn while there.

This post is a quick overview of some of the things JA is stoked to do while in Denver at the Free Press event, luminaries we hope to meet, and things we can’t wait to learn more about! We welcome your comments on what you hope to take away, or bring, to the upcoming gathering of great minds and disruptive discussion. Read the rest of this entry →

AltWeeklies Content Exchange

March 1, 2013 in Distribution, Resources, Revenue

The AltWeeklies Content Exchange allows all members to privately share photo and video with one another. This means when a story breaks in Washington, Colorado can have access; if something of note happens in New Orleans, Portland can also run it.

Collaborate, Share Content, Co-fund longform stories. Hyper-local publications like yours regularly run local takes of a national story (e.g. Presidential Elections/Occupy Wall Street/SOPA, etc). Now you can have a bank of media from around the country that you can use.

You may think that your hyper-local news doesn’t have a national audience, but think of the last year – was there any piece of content from your paper that went viral? Any newsworthy event that happened locally that went around the country or the world?

Chances are you have at least few, and they can be syndicated to the Washington Post, New York Times, or even the Moscow Daily. By selling licenses to just one popular story you can make between $15-50K; sell a few and you can double your editorial budget. Best of all, you don’t have to change a thing – just go out and get the best local content as usual.” Source: altweeklies.cont3nt.com

Renaissance Journalism

February 22, 2013 in Education, Resources

Renaissance Journalism provides training, technical assistance, consultation and grants to journalists and organizations that share our passion for media innovations that strengthen communities. Key to our success is forging dynamic and entrepreneurial partnerships among mainstream news organizations, ethnic and community media, hyperlocal websites, foundations, academia and nonprofits.

Renaissance Journalism was created in 2009 as a program of San Francisco State University’s Department of Journalism. It operates in partnership with ZeroDivide, a funder, thought partner, and capacity-building organization working to transform underserved communities through the strategic use of technology.” Source: Renaissance Journalism