You are browsing the archive for Community.

Decoding Collaboration Part 2: News collaborations – defining impact

August 8, 2013 in Blog, Community

Jo Ellen Green Kaiser, who leads The Media Consortium, has been going deep on collaboration in her work. Here, she generously offers a number of insights, with this the second of her three-part series:

Light at the end

Might defining impact to reflect new market realities for journalism help blaze a new trail to sector level transformation? Credit: Lisa Skube

News Collaborations:
Part I: What do we mean by the word “collaboration”?
Part II: How can collaboration create impact? (see below)
Part III: How can collaborations shape the future of journalism? (coming next)

As Jo Ellen describes it, “‘Collaboration’ has become such a sexy term in the journalism world that centers and sites are being built around it. As I noted in my previous post, content sharing, resource sharing, and even joint reporting is not new. What excites those of us looking to the future of journalism is what I have called networked collaboration… 

In a networked collaboration, a number of different outlets work together to produce original reporting around a particular topic. In vertical networks, that reporting is designed and supervised by one outlet; in horizontal networks, the work is co-operatively created, managed by a backbone organization with no editorial skin in the game…”

In this post we explore the implications of impact and look at a couple of different examples of networked collaborations. With some rich context around how news providers may gain more yield by breaking down what impact means, and potential ways to create more of it. Read the rest of this entry →

Decoding Collaboration Part 1: Can or should news collaboration be forced?

July 24, 2013 in Blog, Community

The Media Consortium LogoTo scale impact, invest in networks.

Jo Ellen Green Kaiser

Jo Ellen Green Kaiser is the executive director of The Media Consortium. Green-Kaiser’s rich background includes a BA from Yale, a PhD from the University of California, with an impressive body of work across numerous independent magazines; she is a leading figure in Jewish media and an expert on the Jewish social justice movement.

Journalism Accelerator

Jo Ellen Green Kaiser, who leads The Media Consortium, has been going deep on collaboration in her work. Here she generously offers a number of insights, with this the first of her three part series:

News Collaborations:
Part I: What do we mean by the word “collaboration”?
Part II: How does collaboration create impact?
Part III: How can collaborations shape the future of journalism?

With collaboration at the center of the JA’s work, we’ve followed Media Shift’s Collaboration Central work with interest.  As well as others who are monitoring new models of collaboration emerging across the news and information spectrum.  Civic engagement “table” development methodology is part of the DNA that inspired the JA’s cross network emphasis (“beyond the usual suspects”). Inspired by wildly successful state organizing efforts, collaboration in this instance fueled by a philanthropic community where funders worked in partnership to build infrastructure to deliver commonly held objectives, leveraging the existing capabilities of civic organizations already existing in the marketplace. Taking out all partisan attachment (progressives were the architects of this infrastructure) – the simple genius of this: How to deploy the power of civic good networks around common aims – respectful of unique missions – to deliver the combined capabilities of unique specialization already creating small scale impact in the marketplace? (i.e. content delivery, craft, community conduit, social, business, technology, product development, topical expertise, etc.) Last year about this time the JA was looking at the combination of revenue and sustainability related to collaboration. Taking this a step further, we’re revisiting this asking others where they see the greatest impact around networked collaboration. As well as asking, what are the barriers slowing progress?

In this post, Jo Ellen explores new working definitions of collaboration and opportunities to consider for deeper impact, leveraging collaboration to unleash the combined power of networks in more intentional and strategic ways. Read the rest of this entry →

2012: What we know now on the value of volunteers, intentional conversation and collaboration for non-profit media

January 30, 2013 in Blog, Community

Journalism Accelerator

As the final of our four-part series exploringWas 2012 the year of prosperity for publishers?” – in this post we explore the value of volunteers, intentional curated conversation and connected collaboration for non-profit media. We hear from Mark Glaser, executive editor of PBS MediaShift and Idea LabDan Moulthrop, curator of conversation at The Civic Commons; and Josh Stearns, public media campaign director at Free Press. The third post in JA’s “what we know now” 2012 series offers specific ideas on building public trust, raising money and a free press powered by the people. The second post in the series reveals practical perspective on local advertising, meeting the needs of communities and customer connection. With 2013 now under way, may the lessons of 2012 help pave the way for greater prosperity in the year ahead! Read the rest of this entry →

JA Editor Profile: Back to the field, with new perspective and knowledge

January 16, 2013 in Blog, Community

Emily Harris

At the Poynter-KSU media ethics conference in 2012, Emily Harris engages students in the conversation. Photographer: Susan Kirkman Zake

Journalism Accelerator

In late September 2011, Emily Harris joined the Journalism Accelerator to lead and shape our editorial program. In late 2012, Emily was offered an opportunity to serve as NPR’s Jerusalem correspondent, a challenge she is excited to take on. This post offers Emily’s take on this new opportunity and what new perspectives she’ll bring with her from her time at the JA. The work Emily began here will focus deeper in 2013 on publisher sustainability and peer-to-peer idea exchange to fuel the field, with an announcement in early February of our new lead on editorial to carry forward this critically important work.

Guiding, covering and going deep with publishers, innovators and entrepreneurs exploring new forms of sustainability emerging in the field, Emily has delivered a body of work that lays a foundation for a new kind of living-knowledge base designed around conversation. A knowledge base that synthesizes more than 1,800 comments from practitioners in the field shared on JA, across more than a dozen major forums, scores of direct conversations and on-site facilitation to bring our community practical and proven techniques others have tried, to shorten their path to sustainability. The JA team holds the deepest regard and offers best wishes for Emily as she channels all she has learned from all of you into her work halfway around the world, striving to help make global news relevant to local communities. – Lisa Skube, JA founder and director Read the rest of this entry →

2012: What we know now on local advertising, meeting the needs of communities and customer connection

January 9, 2013 in Blog, Community

Journalism Accelerator

As part of the larger story, the top lessons from a range of perspectives learned over 2012 is a four-part series the JA is running over the month of January. This is the second part of the series and features three thought leaders – Dick O’Hare, CEO & founder of Local Yokel Media; John Garrett, CEO and publisher of Community Impact Newspaper; and Laura Rich, co-founder of Street Fight – offering their insights. Together our initial think group shared a collective sense in early 2012 that publishers could benefit from a roadmap of the many small steps needed to increase and stabilize revenue across the industry. These additional contributors offer the lessons they’ve learned leading and growing successful new companies; all of them launched five years ago or less. Read the rest of this entry →

JA Resource Q&A: A social strategy of “purpose and intention”

October 22, 2012 in Blog, Community, Distribution

socialnewsdesk
Former journalist Kimberly Wilson started SocialNewsDesk to tailor social media management to the quirks of a newsroom. She wanted to solve three problems she saw in newsrooms social media management: organization, security and setting goals. 

Journalism Accelerator

What are the biggest challenges for news organizations juggling multiple social media platforms? In the ever-changing, character-limited continuum of Twitter and Facebook, what ways can you most effectively build your business, organize your system, engage your audience with information that is useful to them, maintain internal confidentiality and synchronize the work of your team?

To understand how deliberate systematization can optimize your social media presence on a large or small scale, we invited SocialNewsDesk founder Kimberly Wilson and social media curator Cynthia Parkhill to share their expertise and experience. It’s part of our regular series of live conversations showcasing resources that offer support to the journalism community.  Read the rest of this entry →

JA Resource Q&A: The Civic Commons draws a line from online engagement to policy impact

September 19, 2012 in Blog, Community, Experiments

Civic Commons
The Civic Commons is designed as a social media environment for civil conversation and action, where the expertise of non-experts contributes to public knowledge. Moulthrop says it’s a form of journalism. “What we’re doing is bringing the public into the conversation in a way that is sophisticated, civil and productive.”

Journalism Accelerator

The Civic Commons was conceived as a “social media environment designed explicitly for public good.” Physically based in Ohio, it is an online home for conversation that intersects with news that affects people’s lives. Recent discussions have tackled parental support for public education, gas and oil development, including fracking, civility in public discourse, and drawing new boundaries in a county with 59 municipalities!

The Civic Commons partners with local media organizations to go deeper on stories and tap into a wealth of community knowledge. The JA is also partnering with The Civic Commons, Poynter and Kent State University to put on a series of discussions that will lead to a new ethics guide to best practices in political coverage. We chose The Civic Commons for our series of chats about resources listed on the JA to learn more about how civic conversation can contribute to journalism and deepen reporting on the issues that matter to local communities. Read the rest of this entry →

JA Resource Q&A: JReporter “facilitates a two-way conversation between the media company and its audience.”

September 6, 2012 in Blog, Community

JReporter 

JReporter is a mobile software app designed for editors to ask for community reporting, and get back useful, verifiable information in an easy to manage way. There is room for ads and sponsorships. JReporter can also send news stories to readers. It’s new, and JJCS is looking for partners to test drive.

Journalism Accelerator

JReporter is new; its creators at JJCS are looking for newsrooms with a commitment to community engagement to test it. Essentially, JReporter is a white label (meaning you can put your own brand on it) mobile app that’s designed to make gathering and reporting community news easy for both contributors (whether professional reporters or community contributors) and news organizations.

We chose JReporter for the second in our new online conversation series highlighting specific resources for publishers from our growing collection because it aims to solve specific problems we hear about in JA conversations, most notably fewer staff, challenges in engaging audience, and the need for multiple sources of revenue.

“Just like other apps on their smart phones.” That is how JJCS executive director Jo Ann Froelich would describe JReporter to someone who might use it to send video of a school soccer match, or a bit of Q &A from a city council meeting, to a local news organization. It “facilitates a two-way conversation between the media company and its audience,” says JJCS founder John Juliano. Editors can “assign” with JReporter by posting a note about what coverage they’re actively looking for. Read the rest of this entry →

JA publisher profile: The Hawaii Independent, a profitable co-op “rooted in the community…like the Green Bay Packers.”

August 29, 2012 in Blog, Community, Revenue

About Ikaika Hussey

Ikaika Hussey helped start The Hawaii Independent with a handful of local journalists and activists in 2008. He previously worked in community organizing, and says he “knew a lot of stories” that he felt needed to be told. He says making sure to do sales along with editorial work every single day allowed The Independent to turn a profit last year. He expects another profitable year in 2012.

Journalism Accelerator

The Hawaii Independent started as a standard, albeit small, for-profit corporation five years ago. A handful of local investors put their money into the local news venture built by a group of local journalists and activists, including editor and publisher Ikaika Hussey. But after several years, Hussey went back to those investors and pitched a switch to a cooperative business model for the news organization. The change happened earlier this year; he mentioned the plans during the JA forum on local and niche news sites last February. We called him recently to follow up and learned that The Hawaii Independent now offers both subscriptions and ownership, with different benefits, following international cooperative principles and guided by organizational bylaws.

Hussey is inspired by The Banyan Project, his belief that independent media must be locally owned, and a vision of community contributors building solid journalism. The Hawaii Independent was profitable last year, and Hussey intends to send all member-owners a check at the end of 2012. This interview has been edited for clarity and length. Read the rest of this entry →

JA publisher profile with ProPublica’s Stephen Engelberg: “This may shake out to be a Golden Age of investigative reporting.”

August 10, 2012 in Blog, Community, Craft, Distribution, Education, Experiments, Policy, Revenue, Technology

Stephen Engelberg

ProPublica managing editor Stephen Engelberg at the University of Oregon’s Turnbull Center. Image: Lisa Skube.

Journalism Accelerator

Raising money, gaining audience, having impact. Despite a ten million dollar annual budget, 34 reporters and partnerships with multiple major news organizations, ProPublica faces similar sustainability issues as many startup publishers. ProPublica’s managing editor (set to become editor-in-chief early next year) Stephen Engelberg spoke with a couple dozen journalists at the University of Oregon’s Turnbull Center in Portland this week. Here are his views on some of the major challenges investigative, nonprofit news organizations face today.

Stephen Engelberg had never done any fundraising before becoming second-in-command at ProPublica, the high-profile, nonprofit, investigative news organization set up in 2007. He didn’t have to right away; for the first three years ProPublica received ten million dollars a year from a foundation set up by Herb and Marion Sandler with their earnings from the savings and loan industry. ProPublica’s budget has remained the same, but the Sandler Foundation share fell to half last year. As Engelberg prepares to lead the first online-only news organization to win a Pulitzer Prize, money, branding, the expectations of donors and making an impact are on his mind. Read the rest of this entry →