You are browsing the archive for Engagement Models.

PauPress

August 2, 2013 in Resources, Technology

PauPress began back in 2006 when we started to code sites in WordPress for non-profits and start-ups. In 2010 it started to take shape as we built out a suite of functions for a number of large sites that had a demand for an integrated, professional platform to manage both their content and their audience. Since then it’s been a staple of our production environments for both large and small organizations alike. The concept was pretty simple — provide CRM functionality without all the baggage, headaches and costs so that social missions and creative endeavors could do more with less.

“We are Frank and Karoline Neville-Hamilton and we’ve been doing this sort of work online for non-profits and creative individuals since the late 90′s. We’ve worked with clients as large as the WorldBank and the United Nations and we’ve worked with endeavors as small as sites for our close friends who have taken the leap into self-employment. We’d like to think that that broad range of experience gives us a really good perspective on how solid business practices can be simplified and applied so that everyone can grow to do what they do best.” Source: PauPress

“With PauPress you can easily add and arrange as many custom fields to your user’s profiles as you need, set advanced permissions and then search those fields to find commonalities or differences. You can create as many contact forms as you like from your existing user fields and track detailed user activity with an intuitive note system. These are the basics of any CRM (contact relationship management) application and PauPress does it all with the ease and simplicity of WordPress.

“Need to do more? With the pro version, you get front-end user registration and account management, searching of user activity, bulk editing of users & actions, import user data, a full-featured e-commerce solution for purchases and donations, an email marketing engine that integrates with MailChimp, Google Maps, User-generated content and Membership restricted access — all integrated into the same application for a seamless user interface that just works.” Source: Plugpress.com

Decoding Collaboration Part 1: Can or should news collaboration be forced?

July 24, 2013 in Blog, Community

The Media Consortium LogoTo scale impact, invest in networks.

Jo Ellen Green Kaiser

Jo Ellen Green Kaiser is the executive director of The Media Consortium. Green-Kaiser’s rich background includes a BA from Yale, a PhD from the University of California, with an impressive body of work across numerous independent magazines; she is a leading figure in Jewish media and an expert on the Jewish social justice movement.

Journalism Accelerator

Jo Ellen Green Kaiser, who leads The Media Consortium, has been going deep on collaboration in her work. Here she generously offers a number of insights, with this the first of her three part series:

News Collaborations:
Part I: What do we mean by the word “collaboration”?
Part II: How does collaboration create impact?
Part III: How can collaborations shape the future of journalism?

With collaboration at the center of the JA’s work, we’ve followed Media Shift’s Collaboration Central work with interest.  As well as others who are monitoring new models of collaboration emerging across the news and information spectrum.  Civic engagement “table” development methodology is part of the DNA that inspired the JA’s cross network emphasis (“beyond the usual suspects”). Inspired by wildly successful state organizing efforts, collaboration in this instance fueled by a philanthropic community where funders worked in partnership to build infrastructure to deliver commonly held objectives, leveraging the existing capabilities of civic organizations already existing in the marketplace. Taking out all partisan attachment (progressives were the architects of this infrastructure) – the simple genius of this: How to deploy the power of civic good networks around common aims – respectful of unique missions – to deliver the combined capabilities of unique specialization already creating small scale impact in the marketplace? (i.e. content delivery, craft, community conduit, social, business, technology, product development, topical expertise, etc.) Last year about this time the JA was looking at the combination of revenue and sustainability related to collaboration. Taking this a step further, we’re revisiting this asking others where they see the greatest impact around networked collaboration. As well as asking, what are the barriers slowing progress?

In this post, Jo Ellen explores new working definitions of collaboration and opportunities to consider for deeper impact, leveraging collaboration to unleash the combined power of networks in more intentional and strategic ways. Read the rest of this entry →

The ROI of Customer Experience

March 28, 2013 in Resources, Revenue

As customers become more connected and share their experiences freely with one another, customer experience is having a profound impact on corporate business performance. Customers now expect nothing short of outstanding experiences from the companies they choose to do business with, based on exceptional experiences they’ve received from companies like Apple and Amazon. Customers have little tolerance for bad experiences or mediocrity. What’s more, if customers don’t have great experiences across all of the touchpoints they use, they’ll switch their allegiances to companies that can deliver them.

It’s not just about the product anymore. Customers shape their attitudes and behaviors toward companies based on the totality of their experiences with a brand, including support and other interactions they have. Indeed, customers base their purchasing decisions on a variety of factors, including recommendations, previous experiences with a brand, and current needs. Why is it, then, that companies are still measuring their performance based on outdated productcentric metrics like units sold per quarter or by region? New Economy leaders have figured out that the old model no longer works and they are gathering—and acting—on customer insight to drive product, campaign, and service strategies. They are focusing on customer metrics, such as willingness to recommend and likelihood to purchase, as drivers for business growth.

These actions are critical in the socially connected, always-on economy. When customers post about their experiences on Facebook, Twitter, or other online forums, it can have serious business consequences for companies, both positive and negative.” Source: Teletech

2012: What we know now on the value of volunteers, intentional conversation and collaboration for non-profit media

January 30, 2013 in Blog, Community

Journalism Accelerator

As the final of our four-part series exploringWas 2012 the year of prosperity for publishers?” – in this post we explore the value of volunteers, intentional curated conversation and connected collaboration for non-profit media. We hear from Mark Glaser, executive editor of PBS MediaShift and Idea LabDan Moulthrop, curator of conversation at The Civic Commons; and Josh Stearns, public media campaign director at Free Press. The third post in JA’s “what we know now” 2012 series offers specific ideas on building public trust, raising money and a free press powered by the people. The second post in the series reveals practical perspective on local advertising, meeting the needs of communities and customer connection. With 2013 now under way, may the lessons of 2012 help pave the way for greater prosperity in the year ahead! Read the rest of this entry →

100 Reporters

June 27, 2012 in Community, Craft, Experiments, Resources

100Reporters is a revolutionary news organization, dedicated to forging new frontiers in responsible journalism. It joins scores of the planet’s finest professional reporters with whistle-blowers and citizen journalists across the globe, to report on corruption in all its forms. The organization, spearheaded by veteran correspondents of top-tier news outlets, aims to raise the caliber, impact and visibility of citizen-driven investigative journalism, as a means of promoting transparency and good government.

Thanks to advances in technology and heightened transparency among international institutions, we are in an unprecedented position to know and report more than ever before on both the flow of illicit cash, and on the spending habits of government officials and their friends….

Our goal is to embrace technology’s potential to build new forms of journalism around a towering, intractable global issue. We’re working with citizens–the first victims of graft and cronyism–to expose the corruption around them, and bringing these citizens into the reporting of stories where possible.

With initial backing from The Ford Foundation, we are building a multiplatform site where sources can submit—anonymously, if necessary—news tips and evidence of corruption. These will become the raw material for stories to be reported and written by our professional journalists, and presented in hard-hitting news reports available to a worldwide audience. Where feasible, our 100 reporters will work hand-in-hand with citizen journalists, sharing bylines and payment.” Source: 100 Reporters

Engaging Audiences: Measuring Interactions, Engagement and Conversions

June 15, 2012 in Community, Resources

The rise of social media tools has empowered online news startups to distribute content, market their sites and track users. However, most small news sites say they cannot lasso data to track whether they are turning users into supporters who will help their sites survive.

According to a national survey on audience engagement, nearly eight in 10 online survey respondents said they could not measure whether their engagement strategies were also converting readers into advertisers, donors, content contributors or volunteers…

“Such an effort is beyond our capacity,” said one respondent. “We need help,” said another.

These are among key findings of a new survey, funded by the Robert R. McCormick Foundation, focusing on how “digitalfirst” news sites are engaging their audiences and measuring that engagement.

“These small sites can measure interaction with their content, but they don’t have good tools to measure meaningful engagement,” said Jan Schaffer, director of J-Lab: The Institute for Interactive Journalism, which spearheaded the research. “This affects both the future of their operations and the impact they can have in their communities.”

…At least four types of engagement surfaced in the survey responses, but how well the respondents optimized these engagement strategies varied by organization. They include:

  • Engagement as outreach, driving users to consume content.
  • Engagement as reaction, inviting users to comment, share, like and chat.
  • Engagement as stakeholder participation, getting users to contribute stories, time, funding.
  • Engagement as civic participation, activating audience members to address community issues.”

Source: Engaging Audiences: Measuring Interactions, Engagement and Conversions (pdf)

The Story So Far: What We Know About the Business of Digital Journalism

August 18, 2011 in Craft, Distribution, Resources, Revenue

Can digital journalism be profitable? What’s making money, what isn’t, and why? A new report from Columbia University faculty members Bill Grueskin, academic dean of the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, and Ava Seave, principal at Quantum Media and adjunct professor at the Columbia Business School, addresses these questions about the financial state of digital journalism. The report provides the most comprehensive analysis to date of the business challenges that for-profit news organizations face with their digital ventures. The report is being issued by the school’s Tow Center for Digital Journalism, which is committed to the research and advancement of journalism on digital platforms. Grueskin, Seave, and Ph.D. candidate Lucas Graves spent several months reporting on-site at news organizations—some founded over a century ago and others created in the past year or two. Based on the resulting body of data, they examine how news organizations allocate resources, explore what patterns are emerging in revenue streams, and draw conclusions about how companies might generate revenue more effectively. The report is divided into nine chapters covering advertising models at a diverse array of news organizations, alternative platforms, new revenue streams, audience engagement and more.” SourceColumbia Journalism School