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Society for New Communications Research

May 22, 2012 in Education, Experiments, Resources

The Society for New Communications Research is a global nonprofit 501(c)(3) research and education foundation and think tank founded in 2005 to focus on the advanced study of the latest developments in new media and communications, and their effect on traditional media and business models, communications, culture and society.

SNCR is dedicated to creating a bridge between the academic and theoretical pursuit of these topics and the pragmatic implementation of new media and communications tools and methodologies.

The Society’s Fellows include a leading group of futurists, scholars, business leaders, professional communicators, members of the media and technologists from around the globe—all collaborating together on research initiatives, educational offerings, and the establishment of standards and best practices.” Source: The Society for New Communications Research

Michele McLellan’s List of Hyperlocal News Sites

December 16, 2011 in Community, Craft, Experiments, Resources

[T]he Knight Digital Media Center’s Michele McLellan — also a fellow at the University of Missouri’s Reynolds Journalism Institute — has a mind-blowingly thorough taxonomy of local news organizations across the country. This is definitely a post you’ll want to save for future reference.” Source: Nieman Lab

“As a fellow at the Reynolds Journalism Institute in 2009, Michele McLellan created a list of promising local news sites. She also developed broad categories for classifying what is emerging on the local news landscape … Among those categories, Block by Block activities are designed with four site types in mind: Community, Local aggregator, Micro local and Local niche. In addition, Michele created criteria for the list that are designed to identify sites that are working on all three legs of the sustainability stool: Content, community engagement and revenue.” Source: Block by Block

 

 

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fellow at the Reynolds Journalism Institute in 2009, Michele McLellan created a list of promising local news sites. She also developed broad categories for classifying what is emerging on the local news landscape

Among those categories, Block by Block activities are designed with four site types in mind: Community, Local aggregator, Micro local and Local niche.
In addition, Michele created criteria for the list that are designed to identify sites that are working on all three legs of the sustainability stool: Content, community engagement and revenue. (SOURCE: http://www.blockbyblock.us/sample-page/)

Knight Digital Media Center

November 23, 2011 in Craft, Education, Resources, Technology

The Knight Digital Media Center was launched in April 2006 to focus on helping journalists succeed in the rapidly changing media landscape of the 21st Century.

The Center provides competitive fellowships to traditional journalists from print and broadcast media who seek multimedia skill training and want to make the transition to New Media journalism. The goal is to provide the foundation of technical skills and story-telling techniques required by New Media platforms. This training is done at UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism under the supervision of Lanita Pace-Hinton, director of multimedia training programs for the Center.

For digitally fluent journalists, who have already crossed the bridge into New Media newsrooms, the Center provides training fellowships at USC Annenberg School for seminars focused on professional growth, critical thinking, digital leadership and news entrepreneurship. The goal is to increase the depth and sophistication of their work and their understanding of the changing news ecology. This training is under the supervision of Vikki Porter, director of the Center.

The Knight Digital Media Center is built on the foundation of the Western Knight Center for Specialized Journalism which trained more than 750 professional journalists between 2000 and 2006, as well as providing at least 75,000 more journalists with access to resources and online training opportunities through the efforts of its fellows. Archives of the WKC seminars are available at WKConline.org.” Source: Knight Digital Media Center

Pew Report: How News Happens

October 24, 2011 in Community, Distribution, Resources, Revenue

Who really reports the news that most people get about their communities? What role do new media, blogs and specialty news sites now play?

How, in other words, does the modern news “ecosystem” of a large American city work? And if newspapers were to die—to the extent that we can infer from the current landscape—what would that imply for what citizens would know and not know about where they live?

The questions are becoming increasingly urgent. As the economic model that has subsidized professional journalism collapses, the number of people gathering news in traditional television, print and radio organizations is shrinking markedly. What, if anything, is taking up that slack?

The answers are a moving target; even trying to figure out how to answer them is a challenge. But a new study by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism, which takes a close look at the news ecosystem of one city suggests that while the news landscape has rapidly expanded, most of what the public learns is still overwhelmingly driven by traditional media—particularly newspapers.

The study, which examined all the outlets that produced local news in Baltimore, Md., for one week, surveyed their output and then did a closer examination of six major narratives during the week, finds that much of the “news” people receive contains no original reporting. Fully eight out of ten stories studied simply repeated or repackaged previously published information.” Source: Journalism.org

The Seattle Times: News Partner Network

September 9, 2011 in Community, Craft, Resources, Technology

“I’ve read a lot about The Seattle Times and the News Partner Network, a collaboration between The Times and more than 40 community news sites to share story links and photos among the sites. In 2009, The Times was one of five news organizations that received funding through J-Lab to build a local news network involving at least five community news sites.

As you can see, The Times took that project and ran with it, building what is likely the most extensive collaboration network involving a newspaper and community news sites. In discussions last week with Bob Payne, partnerships and audience engagement editor at The Times, and representatives of four of the partner sites, I heard both what makes the network work and where some of the ongoing challenges lie.

Bob makes it clear that this is about collaboration, not about The Times trying to big-foot the community sites. The Times highlights the work of the community sites on its website and links to the stories. That means The Times doesn’t get the web traffic; the pageviews and unique visitors accrue to the community sites, not the newspaper’s site.

The Times doesn’t want to substitute its own news judgment or editorial practices for those of the sites. The site publishers are the experts in their communities, Bob said. The benefit The Times derives from the partnership is extended reach; Times readers are able to connect into community news that the newspaper would never cover, or that it would cover only in brief. In this way, The Times burnishes its role as a news and information hub for Seattle.” Source: Janet Coats, The Patterson Foundation

The Story So Far: What We Know About the Business of Digital Journalism

August 18, 2011 in Craft, Distribution, Resources, Revenue

Can digital journalism be profitable? What’s making money, what isn’t, and why? A new report from Columbia University faculty members Bill Grueskin, academic dean of the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, and Ava Seave, principal at Quantum Media and adjunct professor at the Columbia Business School, addresses these questions about the financial state of digital journalism. The report provides the most comprehensive analysis to date of the business challenges that for-profit news organizations face with their digital ventures. The report is being issued by the school’s Tow Center for Digital Journalism, which is committed to the research and advancement of journalism on digital platforms. Grueskin, Seave, and Ph.D. candidate Lucas Graves spent several months reporting on-site at news organizations—some founded over a century ago and others created in the past year or two. Based on the resulting body of data, they examine how news organizations allocate resources, explore what patterns are emerging in revenue streams, and draw conclusions about how companies might generate revenue more effectively. The report is divided into nine chapters covering advertising models at a diverse array of news organizations, alternative platforms, new revenue streams, audience engagement and more.” SourceColumbia Journalism School