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twitonomy

June 1, 2013 in Resources, Technology

Get detailed and visual analytics on anyone’s tweets, retweets, replies, mentions, hashtags… Browse, search, filter and get insights on the people you follow and those who follow you … Monitor your interactions with fellow users of Twitter: mentions, retweets, favorites… Backup/export any user’s tweets to an Excel spreadsheet in just one click Monitor tweets from your favorite users, lists and keyword searches … Find out easily those you follow but don’t follow you back … Easily add & remove people you follow to your lists … jGet the list of the followers you don’t follow back … Add and remove people in batch to your lists … Browse, search, filter and sort your lists … Track clicks on the links in your tweets” Source: twitonomy

Another app I’ve just discovered, and, for me, is helping to fill the void left when I left Crowdbooster, is Twitonomy. It has some pretty great features: analytics, breaking down your tweets and showing you how you are doing with re-tweets and @mentions. …

“My favorite thing about Twitonomy is that you don’t have to have access to someone’s twitter account to analyze it. You wanna check out your competition? Just put their Twitter handle in the little box, and they’ll analyze it for you!” Source: Rebecca Coleman

JA Resource Q&A: “See the documents that support fact-checks”

December 5, 2012 in Blog, Craft

EconocheckInvestigative Reporters and Editors teamed up with the Sunlight Foundation to create a guide to key national economic databases as a tool to fact-check political claims. Designed for journalists on deadline, useful and accessible to interested citizens, EconoCheck hopes to expand this service built initially for the 2012 election.

Journalism Accelerator

EconoCheck is a collection of economic data covering major issues frequently in the news. It’s designed to give reporters a quick way to understand the context of the data and a direct link to the datasets themselves.

EconoCheck was built with a simple premise: It can be challenging to verify economic claims. So the Sunlight Foundation teamed up with Investigative Reporters and Editors to offer direct links and helpful context to extract accurate information from key national economic datasets.

Data expert and journo prof David Herzog collaborated with Sunlight and IRE to launch EconoCheck for the 2012 election.

In the latest JA Resource Q&A, we talked with Herzog about how to report data effectively and how this tool can be useful outside the immediate demands of an election cycle. Read the rest of this entry →

TweetCharts

October 25, 2012 in Resources, Technology

Enter any word, phrase, hashtag, URL or username and TweetCharts will return a comprehensive report, including data on reply, retweet, and link percentages as well as the most common words, most mentioned users, most used hashtags and more.” Source: Dan Zarrella, TweetCharts

TweetCharts, a new site from Hubspot, does the data crunching for you. Just plug in your phrase or hashtag. It searches the past week’s tweets, and then, pops out lots of pretty charts to show your bosses you’re not just wasting your time tracking or participating in the Twitter conversation. The site explains at a glance who’s talking about the topic and generally, what they’re linking to or how engaged they are in the words you’re looking at.” Source: MediaBistro

EconoCheck

October 11, 2012 in Community, Craft, Resources

Economic issues have taken center stage in this year’s elections, as the United States continues to stagger from the effects of recession and the 2008 global banking crisis. Candidates for federal, state and local offices are looking to tap into voter discontent about issues like unemployment, home foreclosures and the government spending.

It can be tough for journalists to make sense out of candidates’ claims. So the Sunlight Foundation and Investigative Reporters and Editors have teamed up to offer this guide to some of the most authoritative economic data sets. We’ll provide an explanation of what the indicators really mean, their weaknesses and how they are created. Also, we’ll point you to the data and documentation so you can explore for yourself.

We trust these resources will help you better cover the key issues of this election.” Source: EconoCheck

JA How-to: A four-step guerrilla guide to social listening

June 4, 2012 in Blog, Craft, Technology

Social Media Signals

Investing time exploring social listening tools can help tune your business strategy, connecting the dots for greater profitability AND deeper audience connections. Image: Intersection Consulting

Journalism Accelerator

Have you been keeping up with all the hype around “social monitoring” software? There are scores of tools out there that promise to deliver a secret treasure map of insight and intel: how to decode the value of your products by “listening” to your audience “talk” about them across social channels.

Here at the JA, we have been evaluating social listening tools for our own work. This post offers a summary of what we’ve found, for you to consider as you size up methods for deeper knowledge of and engagement with your audience. We’ll tell you a little bit about how each tool works, and share a framework so you can consider how social listening may advance your success. Our goal with this list isn’t to cite everything that’s available, but to present a comprehensive range of options we think may be most useful in your work.

There are a number of ways publishers might apply social listening techniques. Some are simple, some more complex. To help guide the build of our service model, we subscribed to and tested the capabilities of one social listening industry leader, Radian6, over the past eight months. While it appears to satisfy major corporate brands like Pepsi, UPS, and Dell, it didn’t do as well helping the JA achieve its objectives, which are less about brand loyalty and more about tracking emerging trends.

So we began to explore other options. If you’re considering the offerings of the big kids on the block (such as Radian6, Crimson Hexagon, Lithium, Simplify360, or Alterian), know specifically what you want out of it before you go in. Also, don’t let budget stop you from experimenting. If you’re on a shoestring with little time to spare, you may find some tools you need in these free or low-cost alternatives.

Our best success in both choosing tools and getting a good outcome from social listening came from having a clear plan going in. Outlining your community and business requirements early on focuses your search for a social listening solution that provides the best fit for both budget and bandwidth. Know what you want to achieve before you start trying tools, and know how much time you have to invest in the effort. Going in with an idea of what you hope to learn sets up the experiment for a greater return on the effort.

There are four basic steps to successful social listening: discovery, analysis, management and integration. We list tools that can help with each element below. Read the rest of this entry →

Data Journalism Handbook

June 1, 2012 in Craft, Education, Resources, Technology

The Data Journalism Handbook is a free, open source reference book for anyone interested in the emerging field of data journalism.

It was born at a 48 hour workshop at MozFest 2011 in London. It subsequently spilled over into an international, collaborative effort involving dozens of data journalism’s leading advocates and best practitioners – including from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, the BBC, the Chicago Tribune, Deutsche Welle, the Guardian, the Financial Times, Helsingin Sanomat, La Nacion, the New York Times, ProPublica, the Washington Post, the Texas Tribune, Verdens Gang, Wales Online, Zeit Online and many others.” Source: Data Journalism Handbook

This book is intended to be a useful resource for anyone who thinks that they might be interested in becoming a data journalist, or dabbling in data journalism.

Lots of people have contributed to writing it, and through our editorial we have tried to let their different voices and views shine through. We hope that it reads like a rich and informative conversation about what data journalism is, why it is important, and how to do it.

Lamentably the act of reading this book will not supply you with a comprehensive repertoire of all if the knowledge and skills you need to become a data journalist. This would require a vast library manned by hundreds of experts able to help answer questions on hundreds of topics. Luckily this library exists and it is called the internet. Instead, we hope this book will give you a sense of how to get started and where to look if you want to go further. Examples and tutorials serve to be illustrative rather than exhaustive.

We count ourselves very lucky to have had so much time, energy, and patience from all of our contributors and have tried our best to use this wisely. We hope that – in addition to being a useful reference source – the book does something to document the passion and enthusiasm, the vision and energy of a nascent movement. The book attempts to give a sense of what happens behind the scenes, the stories behind the stories.

The Data Journalism Handbook is a work in progress. If you think there is anything which needs to be amended or is conspicuously absent, then please flag it for inclusion in the next version. It is also freely available under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license, and we strongly encourage you to share it with anyone that you think might be interested in reading it.” Source: Data Journalism Handbook

The Center for Digital Information

May 22, 2012 in Craft, Distribution, Resources, Technology

The Center for Digital Information’s mission is to lead the policy research community — think tanks, foundations, government agencies, NGOs and educational institutions — in a fundamental rethinking of how it communicates its findings in a digital society.

While researchers currently rely upon an old model of publishing static documents online, CDI seeks to advance the field toward developing entirely new interactive modes of presentation that utilize the unique capabilities of digital media.

Through interactive production, collaboration, and leadership, CDI’s goal is to ensure that high-quality research remains relevant, engaging and informative to both the public and policymakers as they consume information in new ways brought on by rapid technological change.

The Center’s approach is based on an important distinction between “digital distribution” and “digital information.” Digital distribution is characterized by transmitting material via new media in forms borrowed from a pre-digital era: reports, white papers, articles, issue briefs, fact sheets, and press releases; distributed as static text and PDFs. Digital information is distinguished by communicating natively in new media, using the unique interactive capabilities of the technology.” Source: The Center for Digital Information

Data Management Platforms for Publishers

March 11, 2012 in Community, Technology

Publishers today live in a data-driven world. It is no longer enough to simply create content, build audiences, and sell ads. Ad exchanges, networks, demand-side platforms (DSPs) and supply-side platforms (SSPs) have turned ad-buying into a transparent marketplace where millions of dollars worth of inventory is bought in real-time every day. This fundamental shift in the way media is planned and purchased has led to audience aggregation across publisher inventory, primarily benefiting the buy-side.

Ad networks and DSPs have streamlined the media buying process and helped advertisers reach relevant audiences, but they also pose challenges to publishers accustomed to having more control over their own inventory and monetization. With all of the buy-side innovation and technology over the last few years, publishers of all stripes – from large media companies, to blogs, social networks, and e-commerce sites – are searching for ways to maximize revenue and take back some control, while continuing to offer cutting-edge technology and quality audiences at scale to their clients.

One of the most effective ways for publishers to take charge of their audience data is to use a Data Management Platform (DMP). A DMP allows publishers to separate audience data from media execution platforms, providing an independent method to evaluate the quality and price of individual audiences across various media partners, helping extract the most yield from their inventory…

This whitepaper provides a practical roadmap for publishers looking to leverage DMPs to monetize and increase yield from their site traffic, grow their audiences, and boost ad revenue.” Source: Data Management Platforms for Publishers

Reporters’ Lab: Tools, Techniques & Research for Public Affairs Reporting

February 24, 2012 in Craft, Resources, Technology

Every day, government offices from the local police department to the federal Department of Energy generate artifacts that could become vital elements in investigative and other original journalism. Even when reporters can pry those records from agency warehouses and hard drives, the stories are still hidden in hours of videos, stacks of forms and gigabytes of data housed in unfriendly formats.

More troubling, the full-time reporters who ply their trade in city halls and statehouses are disappearing,  A 2011 study by the Federal Communications Commission documented the decline of local watchdog reporting and described a resulting ‘shift in the balance of power — away from citizens, toward powerful institutions.’

Our goal at the Reporters’ Lab can be stated quite simply: Narrow the power gap by arming on-the-ground reporters with the tools, methods and techniques used by their sources and those working in better-funded disciplines. We want to build the infrastructure that will empower journalists — no matter where they are, what they cover or what job title they carry — by reducing the cost and difficulty of finding, understanding and documenting stories of public interest.” Source: Reporters’ Lab

Crowdmap

January 27, 2012 in Community, Craft, Resources, Technology

Ordinary people have a voice, and interesting things happen when you aggregate those voices and visualize the results. Surprising information and insights can be found.

Crowdmap is a tool that allows you to crowdsource information and see it on a map and timeline. It is the Ushahidi platform, built by the team who created Ushahidi as a way for anyone to run their own crowdsourcing site without having to know the intricacies of running their own server. It’s free and it’s yours to use.” Source: Crowdmap

 

“Digging Out DC (With Help From Kenya)

Ushahidi (Swahili for “testimony”) proved to be the Zelig of 2010 disasters. A social-media application built in Kenya to let citizens alert each other to election unrest, Ushahidi also played a crucial role in mapping the oil spill and the Haiti quake. Ushahidi even helped Washington DC dig itself out from its Snowpocalypse of 2010. The capital, lying more than 50 miles below the Mason Dixon line, didn’t quite know what to do when several feet of snow blanketed the city. But Ushahidi, which is open-source and free to use, was adapted to let Washingtonians record the locations of downed trees, clogged streets, and shoveling squads. Crowdsourced data may be imperfect, but in a crisis—or in a snow-smothered Southern city—it can provide a lot of useful information, fast.” Source: The Atlantic