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Data Management Platforms for Publishers

March 11, 2012 in Community, Technology

Publishers today live in a data-driven world. It is no longer enough to simply create content, build audiences, and sell ads. Ad exchanges, networks, demand-side platforms (DSPs) and supply-side platforms (SSPs) have turned ad-buying into a transparent marketplace where millions of dollars worth of inventory is bought in real-time every day. This fundamental shift in the way media is planned and purchased has led to audience aggregation across publisher inventory, primarily benefiting the buy-side.

Ad networks and DSPs have streamlined the media buying process and helped advertisers reach relevant audiences, but they also pose challenges to publishers accustomed to having more control over their own inventory and monetization. With all of the buy-side innovation and technology over the last few years, publishers of all stripes – from large media companies, to blogs, social networks, and e-commerce sites – are searching for ways to maximize revenue and take back some control, while continuing to offer cutting-edge technology and quality audiences at scale to their clients.

One of the most effective ways for publishers to take charge of their audience data is to use a Data Management Platform (DMP). A DMP allows publishers to separate audience data from media execution platforms, providing an independent method to evaluate the quality and price of individual audiences across various media partners, helping extract the most yield from their inventory…

This whitepaper provides a practical roadmap for publishers looking to leverage DMPs to monetize and increase yield from their site traffic, grow their audiences, and boost ad revenue.” Source: Data Management Platforms for Publishers

An interview with Mike Fancher, author of “Re-Imagining Journalism: Local News for a Networked World”

September 13, 2011 in Blog, Craft, Policy, Revenue

Across the field of journalism we’ve had an “information infusion” from a broad range of sources over the summer. Analysis, review and reporting from the likes of PEW, Knight, the Economist, Clay Shirky, the FCC’s recent 450+ page report furthering the analysis Knight Foundation started two years ago, and CJR’s recent write up “What We Know so Far.” The Chicago Community Trust has released a mother lode of data revealing new insights on the power of linking. The list outlined above is far from exhaustive but a good representation of the depth, breadth and focus on the unfolding of a “news industry interrupted” by some of the brightest minds today.

There is a general consensus that we’re bearing witness to a long-standing community of practice “reimagining” itself, a phrase Mike Fancher refers to in his new report, Local News for a Networked World. Posted  in July, this paper was co-commissioned by the Aspen Institute and the Knight Foundation. As a veteran newsman and community advocate, Fancher brings a unique perspective to this work with a long run as executive editor of one of the finest city paper newsrooms in the nation, The Seattle Times. Noting his career as an editor unfolded in a far less turbulent time in the business lifecycle of news and reporting Fancher retired from the Times in 2008.

The combination of professional experiences Fancher has accrued over the course of his career has expanded further since his retirement. In 2008-2009 he served as a fellow at the Reynolds Journalism Institute at the University of Missouri focusing his study there on journalism ethics evolution in the digital age. Prior to returning to the academy as a fellow, while serving as a city paper editor, Fancher completed his master’s degree in business to better understand news, journalism and the marketplace it lives within, in context. Read the rest of this entry →

Re-Imagining Journalism: Local News for a Networked World

August 31, 2011 in Craft, Education, Experiments, Policy, Resources

Re-Imagining Journalism: Local News for a Networked World, a new policy paper by Michael R. Fancher, identifies five strategic areas and specific ideas for promoting experimentation, collaboration and public engagement that are critical for reforming local journalism. The paper calls upon a variety of stakeholders in business, the nonprofit sector, government and community institutions, and citizens themselves to each play a role in nurturing a revitalized and re-imagined local media ecosystem.

The five key strategies for re-inventing local journalism include:

  1. For-profit media organizations must re-invent themselves to extend the role and values of journalism in interactive ways.
  2. Not-for-profit and non-traditional media must be important sources of local journalism.
  3. Higher education, community and non-profit institutions can be hubs of journalistic activity and other information-sharing for local communities.
  4. Greater urgency must be placed on relevance, research and revenues to support local journalism.
  5. Government at all levels should support policies that create an environment for sustainable, quality local journalism.

In particular, Fancher calls on leaders of local print and broadcast media to spearhead the creation of regional and local collaborative news networks that meet the information needs of their communities. These interactive news networks are part of a broader set of strategies for re-inventing local journalism that are aimed at addressing the need for media policies that foster innovation, competition and support for business models that provide marketplace incentives for quality journalism and envision new roles for universities and community institutions as hubs of journalistic activity.” SourceKnight Foundation