You are browsing the archive for Journalism Ethics.

Conversations for impact: New ethical considerations for political coverage

October 10, 2012 in Blog, Craft

Doug Oplinger presenting at KSU

Akron Beacon Journal managing editor Doug Oplinger says journalists let “too many politicians… shove their own agendas down the pipe.” Credit: Kent State University

Journalism Accelerator

Getting somewhere new. That’s what the four online JA conversations building on the 2012 Poynter/Kent State media ethics workshop are designed to do. Tap into the wisdom of people experienced in ethics, political coverage or both; hear the questions of those fresh to the field; create, informed by these conversations, a crowdsourced best practices guide to political coverage exploring approaches and challenges across the field.

Kent State University journalism professor Jan Leach will lead the creation of that guide in early 2013. Meanwhile, the conversation threads stay open for your input. Outlined below are a number of places where we welcome you to participate! This post highlights key points from discussions on fact-checking and changing the approach to reporting. An earlier distillation covers conversations on managing “access journalism” and the challenges of social media in political coverage. Read the rest of this entry →

Political coverage: Responsive and responsible? Help inform a best practices guide

September 24, 2012 in Blog, Craft

Red State, Blue State Map

Ethics of images? In the 2000 election, The New York Times created one of the first “red state, blue state” maps. This simple data presentation “changed the way we thought about politics,” Poynter’s Kelly McBride told the crowd at the 2012 Poynter Kent State Media Ethics workshop.

Journalism Accelerator

What are the ethical considerations you apply to your reporting in a high-stakes, fast-paced election when:

  • truth is deliberately subject to distortion or lies
  • money is increasingly influential yet harder to track
  • insults distract from the issues
  • people who will be directly affected by the actions of those elected feel disconnected from the process
  • the public largely blames the media as part of the problem

Don’t struggle with these questions alone, or debate them isolated in your own newsroom! Join a larger community of peers, together with the Journalism Accelerator, the Kent State School of Journalism, Poynter and The Civic Commons to gather examples and explore ideas from the 2012 election to inform a new Ethics Best Practices Guide to Political Coverage. Be a part of it and join us! Read the rest of this entry →

Center for Journalism Ethics, University of Wisconsin-Madison

September 10, 2012 in Education, Resources

This website is your source for tracking and analyzing ethical issues in your city or around the world. This site is the public face of the new Center for Journalism Ethics in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

This site will keep you updated on ethical issues in the news, while providing informed analysis on issues, as well as book reviews and interviews with leading figures in journalism. You will access a host of resources, from background discussions on the nature and history of journalism ethics to codes of practice and links to ethics experts.

The aim of the site is to support the mission of the Center for Journalism Ethics – to advance the ethical standards and practices of democratic journalism through discussion, research, teaching, professional outreach, and newsroom partnerships. The center is a voice for journalistic integrity, a forum for informed debate, and an incubator for new ideas and practices. Source: Center for Journalism Ethics University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

The Poynter Institute

January 12, 2012 in Craft, Education, Resources

Poynter is a school that exists to ensure that our communities have access to excellent journalism—the kind of journalism that enables us to participate fully and effectively in our democracy.

What we do

To that end, we teach those who manage, edit, produce, program, report, write, blog, photograph and design, whether they belong to news organizations or work as independent entrepreneurs. We teach those who teach, as well as students in middle school, high school and college—the journalists of tomorrow. And we teach members of the public, helping them better understand how journalism is produced and how to tell for themselves whether it’s credible.

  • We teach in seminar rooms on our main campus in St. Petersburg.
  • We teach in newsrooms all over the world.
  • We teach online, allowing those in search of training to choose from hundreds of self-directed courses, online group seminars, Webinars, online chats, podcasts and video tutorials.

We teach management, ethical decision-making and the power of diversity; we teach editing, writing, reporting and new media skills; we teach those in broadcast, print and the Web; we teach those trying to remake their organizations and those trying to remake their journalistic skills set.” Source: The Poynter Institute

Committee of Concerned Journalists

September 1, 2011 in Community, Craft, Education, Policy, Resources

The Committee of Concerned Journalists is a consortium of journalists, publishers, owners and academics worried about the future of the profession.

To secure journalism’s future, the group believes that journalists from all media, geography, rank and generation must be clear about what sets our profession apart from other endeavors. To accomplish this, the group is creating a national conversation among journalists about principles.

Three Goals

  1. To clarify and renew journalists’ faith in the core principles and function of journalism.
  2. To create a better understanding of those principles by the public.
  3. To engage and inform ownership and management of these principles and their financial as well as social value.

How Do We Accomplish Them?

To initiate a conversation about standards, the group first issued a statement of concern, created a network of professionals nationwide, held twenty-one forums, and conducted surveys and content studies to identify the core principles journalists share. These were then distilled in 2001 into a book, “The Elements of Journalism: What Newspeople Should Know and the Public Should Expect” (Updated and Revised in April 2007). In turn, these ideas are available to news people through our Traveling Curriculum of workshops. The work continues through further research, reporting, writing and discussion.” Source: Committee of Concerned Journalists