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Center for News Literacy

July 27, 2012 in Education, Resources

Critical thinking. Citizenship. The importance of the press. These are some of the tenets of The Center for News Literacy at Stony Brook University’s School of Journalism. Faculty members train the next generation of news consumers to think critically about what they read, watch, and hear.

The Center for News Literacy at Stony Brook University is committed to teaching students how to use critical thinking skills to judge the reliability and credibility of news reports and news sources. It is the only such center in the United States.

Funded by a grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the center currently is committed to teaching News Literacy to 10,000 undergraduates—from across all academic disciplines.

The Center also is at work developing innovative curriculum materials for high schools and the general public.” Source: Center for News Literacy

On The Media

January 27, 2012 in Community, Craft, Education, Policy, Resources

While maintaining the civility and fairness that are the hallmarks of public radio, OTM tackles sticky issues with a frankness and transparency that has built trust with listeners and led to more than a tripling of its audience in five years.

Since OTM was re-launched in 2001, it has been one of NPR’s fastest growing programs, heard on more than 300 public radio stations. It has won Edward R. Murrow Awards for feature reporting and investigative reporting, the National Press Club’s Arthur Rowse Award for Press Criticism and a Peabody Award for its body of work.” Source: On The Media

 

“On the Media is our effort to function as the outsider’s insider. In other words, all of us who work on the show are journalists. But I guess there is something in our collective natures that makes us feel somewhat outside the process, despite the years we may have spent within it.

So we hope that we can demystify the process…

It’s always interesting to cover your own business, but the beat lacks something that is really, really important for reporters like me who like narrative. There’s no story. What you are reporting on are trends, policies, perceptions, and studies. Where are the people? Where is the blood? What are the stakes?

Well there ARE stakes and that is something that we try to focus on a lot, what the stakes are – the continued health of an honest and independent press.” Source: Gothamist

The Poynter Institute

January 12, 2012 in Craft, Education, Resources

Poynter is a school that exists to ensure that our communities have access to excellent journalism—the kind of journalism that enables us to participate fully and effectively in our democracy.

What we do

To that end, we teach those who manage, edit, produce, program, report, write, blog, photograph and design, whether they belong to news organizations or work as independent entrepreneurs. We teach those who teach, as well as students in middle school, high school and college—the journalists of tomorrow. And we teach members of the public, helping them better understand how journalism is produced and how to tell for themselves whether it’s credible.

  • We teach in seminar rooms on our main campus in St. Petersburg.
  • We teach in newsrooms all over the world.
  • We teach online, allowing those in search of training to choose from hundreds of self-directed courses, online group seminars, Webinars, online chats, podcasts and video tutorials.

We teach management, ethical decision-making and the power of diversity; we teach editing, writing, reporting and new media skills; we teach those in broadcast, print and the Web; we teach those trying to remake their organizations and those trying to remake their journalistic skills set.” Source: The Poynter Institute