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JournalismDegree.org

August 2, 2013 in Education, Resources

Journalism Degree.org is a site dedicated to providing timely and relevant information about journalism degrees and programs. We help current and prospective students find the right program to fit their needs. With useful articles and links to accredited institutions, our site provides a single location for students interested in pursuing careers in media and mass communications. …

“But we offer much more than a list of accredited degree programs. We offer our readers an incredible blog with timely news in the journalism world as well as useful tips and suggestions on how to break into the field. Our blogger is a published writer but a recent graduate from City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism.” Source: JournalismDegree.Org

Online journalism degree scholarships make it possible to pay for your education, even if you’re already strapped for cash. Whether you’re going to college straight from high school or heading back to school after years of being in the workforce, these programs can be expensive without financial aid. Scholarships are a great way to pay for the education you need to qualify for journalism jobs such as reporting, editing, publishing, and writing.” Source: Lindsay Harper, JournalismDegree.Org

Center for Journalism Ethics, University of Wisconsin-Madison

September 10, 2012 in Education, Resources

This website is your source for tracking and analyzing ethical issues in your city or around the world. This site is the public face of the new Center for Journalism Ethics in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

This site will keep you updated on ethical issues in the news, while providing informed analysis on issues, as well as book reviews and interviews with leading figures in journalism. You will access a host of resources, from background discussions on the nature and history of journalism ethics to codes of practice and links to ethics experts.

The aim of the site is to support the mission of the Center for Journalism Ethics – to advance the ethical standards and practices of democratic journalism through discussion, research, teaching, professional outreach, and newsroom partnerships. The center is a voice for journalistic integrity, a forum for informed debate, and an incubator for new ideas and practices. Source: Center for Journalism Ethics University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Kent State Media Law Center for Ethics and Access

August 24, 2012 in Craft, Resources

The Media Law Center for Ethics and Access, originally named the Center for Privacy and the First Amendment, offers workshops and seminars in media ethics and access to government information. It provides advice and counsel for anyone — journalists, government officials or members of the public — with questions about ethics or access or related media law concerns. The Center was founded in 1991 to provide information and research on accessing government records and meetings. It was expanded in 2007 to include ethics training and to address issues of access and ethics in online journalism.” Source: Kent State University Media Law Center for Ethics and Access

Each September, the Poynter Institute and the Media Law Center for Ethics and Access at Kent State University host an annual ethics workshop. Topics and discussions are relevant to current trends in the media and journalism education. Presenters and panelists from varying backgrounds provide information and opinions based on personal industry experience.” Source: Kent State University Media Law Center for Ethics and Access

Journalist’s Resource

July 27, 2012 in Craft, Education, Resources

Unlike most journalistic stories or blogs, academic studies are the product of months or years of work; they can include analysis of large sets of data or carefully conducted experiments. A scholar might finish just a few important studies in his or her career, often on problems that have been studied for decades. Studies aspire to say as much as can definitively be known on a particular question, be it complex or seemingly self-evident. Does money in politics cause corruption? You may consider that an obvious question, but for scholars the answer — not just yes or no, but also why and how — has to be proven with precise weighing of evidence. The essence of the scientific method is to come up with a hypothesis, test it, and then make sure it can be repeated – and that no external factors skewed the results.

Many corporations, commercial research firms, advocacy groups and consulting firms also produce studies and in-depth reports. While these can have news value, bear in mind that the findings of such work are not always independently fact-checked prior to publication, whereas studies produced by academic scholars typically are.

Why would a journalist want to read a study?

In a world overflowing with information of uncertain quality, it’s hard to find knowledge that is as unbiased, thoughtful and reliable as that contained in the best academic studies. This is why journalists should be familiar with how to read them. Studies can provide a baseline of solid fact where reporting can begin. When journalists call experts to hear their views, having familiarity with the basic research allows for more enlightening conversations and makes stories deeper. Studies almost always suggest a wealth of new angles for journalists to pursue. Further, journalists are connection points between information and the public; it is a journalist’s job to make things clear to the public that are often hidden. Sometimes this means misdeeds by public officials or large corporations. But sometimes important insights can be locked away in research studies and journals. Understanding how to read studies can allow you to bring sunlight to issues and knowledge that might otherwise remain obscure.” Source: Journalist’s Resource

Center for News Literacy

July 27, 2012 in Education, Resources

Critical thinking. Citizenship. The importance of the press. These are some of the tenets of The Center for News Literacy at Stony Brook University’s School of Journalism. Faculty members train the next generation of news consumers to think critically about what they read, watch, and hear.

The Center for News Literacy at Stony Brook University is committed to teaching students how to use critical thinking skills to judge the reliability and credibility of news reports and news sources. It is the only such center in the United States.

Funded by a grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the center currently is committed to teaching News Literacy to 10,000 undergraduates—from across all academic disciplines.

The Center also is at work developing innovative curriculum materials for high schools and the general public.” Source: Center for News Literacy

Shaping 21st Century Journalism: Leveraging a “Teaching Hospital Model” in Journalism Education

July 27, 2012 in Education, Policy, Resources

As the media industry reshapes itself, a tremendous opportunity emerges for America’s journalism programs. Neither news organizations nor journalism programs will disappear, but both must rethink their missions, particularly now that many more people can be journalists (at least, on an occasional basis) and many more people produce media than ever before.

Journalism education programs have an opportunity to become “anchor institutions” in the emerging informational ecosystem. Many schools have long embraced elements of this vision, but satisfying the information needs of communities will require schools to take on all the challenges of engaging as serious and valuable producers of meaningful journalism. To date, some programs have avoided or shirked these responsibilities, failing to leverage broadcast licenses as part of their educational mission or inadequately supporting the pursuit of meaningful journalism by students….

As Nicholas Lemann, dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University, has written, “Like teaching hospitals, journalism schools can provide essential services to their communities while they are educating their students.” “Source: Shaping 21st Century Journalism (pdf)

The Poynter Institute

January 12, 2012 in Craft, Education, Resources

Poynter is a school that exists to ensure that our communities have access to excellent journalism—the kind of journalism that enables us to participate fully and effectively in our democracy.

What we do

To that end, we teach those who manage, edit, produce, program, report, write, blog, photograph and design, whether they belong to news organizations or work as independent entrepreneurs. We teach those who teach, as well as students in middle school, high school and college—the journalists of tomorrow. And we teach members of the public, helping them better understand how journalism is produced and how to tell for themselves whether it’s credible.

  • We teach in seminar rooms on our main campus in St. Petersburg.
  • We teach in newsrooms all over the world.
  • We teach online, allowing those in search of training to choose from hundreds of self-directed courses, online group seminars, Webinars, online chats, podcasts and video tutorials.

We teach management, ethical decision-making and the power of diversity; we teach editing, writing, reporting and new media skills; we teach those in broadcast, print and the Web; we teach those trying to remake their organizations and those trying to remake their journalistic skills set.” Source: The Poynter Institute