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From Competition to Cooperation: Engaging Cable, Satellite, Internet and Mobile Broadband Service Providers in Meeting the Information Needs of Communities

July 13, 2012 in Distribution, Policy, Resources

Filling gaps in accountability journalism, including waning statehouse coverage, was the central focus when the Center for Media Law and Policy, a joint project of the journalism and law schools at UNC, convened a day-long workshop Jan. 20, 2012, to reflect on the Federal Communication Commission’s 2011 report The Information Needs of Communities.

Report author Steven Waldman was among the participants. “Many a government report has evaporated into the ether after publication,” he said, so the series of workshops organized by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation represents an important model for leveraging a study like his create greater impact…

Because the UNC workshop’s task was to consider ways in which cable, satellite, Internet and mobile providers might contribute more to efforts to bolster accountability journalism, discussion cut across a range of topics broached in Waldman’s FCC report. The workshop could be seen as a barometer for gauging which of the report’s raft of recommendations seemed most urgent to local actors…

The UNC workshop revealed a surprising appetite for cross-industry cooperation. Because participants were especially interested in market-based and voluntary initiatives, the FCC’s role was limited in many discussions.” Source: From Competition to Cooperation report (pdf)

The Future of Journalism Education

October 5, 2011 in Community, Education, Resources

If February’s weather kept you away from New York and the Future of Journalism Education conference at the Paley Center for Media, you weren’t alone. But you can still visit the center’s website to see some seven hours of streaming video about the needs of 21st century journalists, including  entrepreneurial ideas, new relationships with their audiences, new online tools — and, in the words of the Carnegie-Knight Initiative, “an in-depth understanding of the context and complexity of issues facing the modern world”…

Deans, faculty and students from 14 graduate schools of journalism participated in the Carnegie-funded event which, whether it solved anything or not, certainly featured well-informed and thought-provoking discussions…

From a newspaper perspective, panelists included executives and journalists from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The St. Petersburg Times, the Associated Press  and The Guardian, whose New York bureau chief described a contemporary reporting position — his own — in which he can write a 2,000-word analysis in the morning and “tweet” his way through an afternoon typing 140-character online Twitter updates from another news event.

The Future of Journalism Education event (well-Tweeted itself by @paleycenter and others as #paleynews), included an hour-long discussion by Alberto Ibargüen and Vartan Gregorian of the Knight and Carnegie foundations, respectively, and a roundtable on the Carnegie-Knight Initiative‘s News 21 journalism education project.” SourceNewspaper and Online News