Resources Index

Dedicated to supporting African American journalists and coverage, the NABJ offers community and research, plus a jobs board and a style guide with deep context.

National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ)

The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) is an organization of journalists, students and media-related professionals that provides quality programs and services to and advocates on behalf of black journalists worldwide.

Founded by 44 men and women on December 12, 1975, in Washington, D.C., NABJ is the largest organization of journalists of color in the nation.
Many of NABJ’s members also belong to one of the professional and student chapters that serve black journalists nationwide.
NABJ is committed to the following:

  • Strengthening ties among black journalists;
  • Sensitizing all media to the importance of fairness in the workplace for black journalists;
  • Expanding job opportunities and recruiting activities for veteran, young and aspiring black journalists, while providing continued professional development and training;
  • Increasing the number of black journalists in management positions and encouraging black journalists to become entrepreneurs;
  • Fostering an exemplary group of professionals that honors excellence and outstanding achievements by black journalists, and outstanding achievement in the media industry as a whole, particularly when it comes to providing balanced coverage of the black community and society at large;
  • Working with high schools and colleges to identify and encourage black students to become journalists, and to diversify faculties and related curriculum;and
  • Providing informational and training services to the general public.” Source: NABJ

2011 NABJ Diversity Census:

“The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) announced the results of its 4th Annual Television Newsroom Management Diversity Census on Thursday, September 22 during the Congressional Black Caucus Annual Legislative Weekend. The findings were released during a Braintrust Workshop titled “The Deciders…Who Calls the Shots in Broadcast News.”

The report reveals that 228 television stations owned by some of the largest media companies in the United States mostly fall short of matching the demographics of their metropolitan areas.

NABJ encourages newsroom management diversity to ensure fair coverage of communities.

According to the 2010 United States Census, non-Whites comprise nearly 35% of the U-S population but the study finds that people of color fill only 12% of the newsroom manager positions at stations owned by ABC, Belo Corporation, CBS, Cox, Fox, Gannett, Hearst, Lin Media, Media General, Meredith, NBC, Nexstar Broadcasting, E.W. Scripps Company, Post-Newsweek and Tribune.

Out of a total of 1,157 managers, 1,017 are White, 81 are Black, 42 are Hispanic, 16 are Asian and 1 is Native American.” SourceNABJ

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