Resource:

Resources Index

Journos now need fluency in multimedia, data, entrepreneurship and social engagement. Use this report documenting the desire and payoff of training to build a professional development plan.

Digital Training Comes of Age

Journalists want to learn new digital tools and techniques. Will they be comfortable learning those things digitally, using webinars, e-learning and self-directed classes? If online education is easier to provide than ever, are news organizations rising to the occasion?

In its search for answers, this new Knight Foundation report details the Web-survey responses of 660 active alumni from the roughly 3,000 journalists who received Knight-branded professional development within the past two years.

  • Digital Training Comes of Age shows a growing demand for training as journalists adapt to the 21st century’s evolving media ecosystems. Journalists want more training in digital tools such as multimedia, data analysis and technology. Most give their news organizations low marks for providing training opportunities.
  • Digital classes are gaining popularity as a cost-effective way to reach more trainees. Significant numbers of journalists who have participated in online classes say they are as good as, or better than, conventional training in the classroom.
  • Training organizations are adapting to the digital age. They are providing more training online and rethinking how their programs can foster the transformation of journalism.
  • Professional development has impact. Training helps journalists adopt new digital tools, create change in their organizations, or find new ways to be part of the news ecosystem.
  • Continuing education drives change in forward-looking organizations. Training and staff development helps them achieve their goals and become more adaptive.” Source: The Knight Foundation

Based on the 660 journalists surveyed, the Knight survey identified the following 10 key points:

  1. Lack of training is a major source of job dissatisfaction.
  2. Overwhelmingly, journalists say they want more training.
  3. Increasingly, journalists want digital-tools training.
  4. Journalists say they aren’t getting the training they most need.
  5. Most journalists give their news organization poor marks for training.
  6. Journalists used their training and are likely to recommend it.
  7. Online training is growing more popular, especially internationally.
  8. Many journalists pay for their own training.
  9. News organizations must become learning organizations.
  10. Work focus shifts to digital and combined media.

The survey findings show a variety of reasons why news organizations today need to spend more time and resources toward professional development of their employees and include digital learning opportunities as much as possible.

This can be achieved by creating a “learning culture” in the newsroom.

This “learning culture” must be pervasive throughout the whole organization – from the top all the way to the bottom.

There are many ways that news ventures including nonprofits can start creating this kind of culture.” Source: NPJhub.org

The Journalism Accelerator is not responsible for the content we post here, as excerpts from the source, or links on those sites. The JA does not endorse these sites or their products outright but we sure are intrigued with what they’re up to.